Tag Archives: coastal dynamics

Linking management decisions and shoreline dynamics

OBX_erosion

Source: USGS

Shoreline communities along the U.S. Atlantic Coast have a long history of enduring costly and widespread impacts from tropical storms and long-term erosion. Unfortunately, such impacts are likely to worsen with sea-level rise in the future. These impacts are unavoidable – but how we respond to them is up to us. In their new article titled “A coupled physical and economic model of the response of coastal real estate to climate risk,” recently published in Nature Climate Change, Drs. Dylan McNamara and Andrew Keeler address just this aspect of long-term coastline change.

Using coupled agent-based and coastal processes models, they explore the mechanisms underlying shoreline defense decisions in response to long-term sea-level rise and erosion. Those decisions in turn are dependent on property values and individual beliefs of potential impacts. A particularly innovative feature of their model is that collective mitigation actions are determined endogenously through an iterative referendum. Collective action problems become apparent as believers and non-believers of climate risk predictions must decide on community-level adaptation strategies.

The authors find that property owners that disregard predictions of climate change-induced coastal risks tend to be the ones that own property in the riskiest locations, and thus disproportionately receive public disaster assistance funds. In addition, the model is also able to estimate time before abandonment of coastal communities subject to a combination of sea-level rise and erosion.

Many research efforts into climate change adaptation emphasize the physical impacts of climate related hazards. However, this is only one – and arguably the less important – aspect of climate change adaptation. The fate of human-environment systems is largely determined by our decisions of how to respond to changing economic and environmental conditions.

This model gets it right. Explicit consideration of human decision-making, and its underlying motivations, is essential if we are to form realistic expectations of likely future states and formulate successful adaptation strategies.

I look forward to seeing future contributions from these authors!