Monthly Archives: February 2013

Introductory ABM Resources

A list of accessible, simple, and interesting ABM papers and resources for introducing new students: http://mass.leeds.ac.uk/2013/02/13/an-excellent-abm-paper/.

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Video

Food Systems in China

Food_and_China

In honor of Chinese New Year this weekend, this post features an excellent video from The Perennial Plate that highlights two of my favorite things about China: the countryside and food. When you watch the video, you will see linkages between the Chinese passion for food, a rapidly changing agricultural economy, and underlying cultural stigmas associated with agricultural livelihoods. Interactions between these various elements are having profound impacts on rural livelihoods and land-use in the rapidly changing Chinese economy and culture.

A characteristic pattern of the new China, which struck me during my travels in the countryside and is apparent in this video as well, is the demographic disparity as one travels outside the cities. Older generations remain on the farm, work the land, and care for the young children, while many young adults travel to nearby cities in pursuit of higher wages. Such demographic patterns are reinforced by a long-held stigma against agricultural livelihoods and their association with a peasant’s social status.

Given my interest in sustainable agricultural practices and livelihoods, this video resonated with me personally, as well as reminding me of parallels with the many urban agriculture movements that have become so prevalent around the U.S. This story demonstrates the kind of new cultural and social linkages between urban and rural livelihoods that can be created in China as an adaptation (and perhaps reaction) to an increasingly urban and market-driven economy and society.

Tying into the themes of this blog – agent-based modeling and land-use change – the story told in this video is a reminder of the importance of the cultural and social contexts in which land-use and livelihood decisions are made. In particular, this is a vivid example of how cultural and socio-economic forces can create emergent urban-rural teleconnections that lead to new land-uses and livelihood strategies.